Knowing And Knowing

There is a different a difference between knowing something… and knowing something.

This is the difference between knowledge gained in the academic sense- that of a purely intellectual nature- and that knowledge which is reflexive and intuitive.

After my initial mental roadblocks, the continuing issue with “Red Pill” affairs for me has been the differences between those two forms of knowledge. I would like to think that I am pretty good at that first level of understanding. I am quite intelligent, and grasping interconnected concepts such as are discussed in these parts suits me well. On the other hand, I still have issues with knowing things on an intuitive or reflexive level. I find this to be a lot harder for me.

Is it the same for my readers? Or is this just a personality thing?

My suspicion is that intuitive knowledge is more difficult to acquire because it requires actual experience. Military training tries to create as much reflexive knowledge as possible through intense training. The goal is to make training as realistic as possible, so as to get a soldier to act the same way in the field. In terms of a reflexive understanding of women, I don’t think anything but actual experience interacting with them will do. From my understanding PUA training courses often involve a lot of work out in the field interacting with real women. This would tend to support the notion that nothing beats experience.

I also suspect that constant practice is important as well. I wouldn’t be surprised if the intuition aspect of this knowledge can fade over time, especially if a man’s original upbringing was very “Blue Pill.” In that case it isn’t necessarily like riding a bike- it all won’t come back to you right away. In bodybuilding you have to work to keep fit, you slack off and the muscle starts to atrophy. The same principle might apply here as well. I’m curious if my readers have their won thoughts on that.

And in case folks wonder why this post, well, let us just say that I flubbed something recently [at least, I’m 95% sure I did]. Looking back I was able to use that intellectual knowledge to see where I screwed up. At the time though I was thrown, and it took me too long to recover. I am a quick thinker, but not that quick.

Update: Zippy has a great explanation of knowledge/competence:

Unconscious incompetence:
You don’t even know that you don’t know how.

Conscious incompetence:
You know that you don’t know how.

Conscious competence:
You know how, but you have to think about it as you do it.

Unconscious competence:
You know how and don’t have to think about it.

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14 Comments

Filed under Blue Pill, Men, Red Pill, Women

14 responses to “Knowing And Knowing

  1. Unconscious incompetence:
    You don’t even know that you don’t know how.

    Conscious incompetence:
    You know that you don’t know how.

    Conscious competence:
    You know how, but you have to think about it as you do it.

    Unconscious competence:
    You know how and don’t have to think about it.

    Success in many endeavors requires unconscious competence.

  2. Try hovering a helicopter at the “conscious competence” stage, haha. I once ended up about a quarter mile away because someone I know waved at me. I knew I was not going to let go of the cyclic and wave back, but just the thought process – the thought involved in rejecting the impulse to wave – made it impossible to keep the ship steady. My instructor got a good laugh out of it.

    Later in my training I could hover accurately within inches, every time, in windy conditions, without thinking about it.

  3. Zippy, great comments. I will move the first into the main post, it is worthy of repeating. As for the second, I have to say that it is pretty cool you know (or knew) how to fly a chopper.

  4. J

    Hey Donal, I hear you on that.

    Moving from knowing to KNOWING in the women/sex/dating/relationships department might be the type of knowledge Solomon mentions in the Proverbs: “in much wisdom is much grief, and he who increases knowledge increases sorrow.” Considering his history, I’m sure he knew more about this stuff than any of us ever will.

    I only want to really KNOW things (about relationships) without hurting people around me and hardening my own heart in the process (like a PUA). So perhaps, there is a blessing in not KNOWING too much.

    A word of encouragement — don’t give up brother!

    J

  5. MK

    Cool post. I find this issue fascinating. I’m intuitive, having no idea at “why”. But if I can’t then “prove” what I already know using logic, I lack self-confidence so won’t believe myself. Only to discover that I was right all along. It sounds funny, but it sucks.

    Regarding red-pill I honestly never cared how big a fool anyone (esp women) thinks I am. Don’t know if that’s healthy ego, egomania, a low opinion of others, or just plain social sloth. I lean to the latter.

  6. MK – I’m intuitive, having no idea at “why”. But if I can’t then “prove” what I already know using logic, I lack self-confidence so won’t believe myself. Only to discover that I was right all along.

    Happens to me all the time. Trouble is, I’m wrong just often enough to keep me from trusting my gut when I should.

  7. I am pretty good at that first level of understanding. I am quite intelligent, and grasping interconnected concepts such as are discussed in these parts suits me well. On the other hand, I still have issues with knowing things on an intuitive or reflexive level. I find this to be a lot harder for me.

    Is it the same for my readers? Or is this just a personality thing?

    Partly personality, I think. If you’re INTJ (or in my case, INTP), i suspect you tend not to put any trust in anything you can’t intellectually reason out. I’m not sure, but this might be because you’ve seen people act on what they think they “know” and totally make a mess of it.

    My suspicion is that intuitive knowledge is more difficult to acquire because it requires actual experience.

    For most of my life, my experiences have not been the same as most people. Stuff that most people find to be completely obvious is stuff that I have to put thought into. On the other hand, there are a few things that I sail right through that give other people pause.

    I’m guessing you probably have some kind of mismatch-in-experiences with most people as well.

  8. I haven’t flown one in several years. I had initially planned to just take a few lessons, to experience operating the contraption. But it accidentally turned into adding a rotorcraft rating to my pilot’s license. Hovering a helicopter is like driving a truck fast down a bumpy dirt road with a full cup of coffee in one hand. Except that if you spill the coffee the truck flips over.

  9. “At the time though I was thrown, and it took me too long to recover. I am a quick thinker, but not that quick.”

    In the context of Game, it’s always a hard situation because we have to balance hardwired instincts, acquired habits and rational knowledge, all of which are tied into who were are more deeply than using a soldering iron or playing the piano. That’s a major reason I stay engaged in the Manosphere despite going MGTOW Monk, because human sexuality equates human personality.

    Not knowing your exact situation, you probably acted like your natural self and got burned as a direct result. You are not alone. Just the other day, I teased a girl at the gym without intending to–I was tired and in a good mood–and I wouldn’t be surprised if she files a complaint on me, to judge from her reaction.

    But what do we do? Reprogram ourselves into anhedonistic ghosts or sexually aggressive jerkboys? It’s less a question of acting on our Game knowledge than a question of who we want to be.

  10. DJ

    Don’t overthink , develop outcome independence , act confident, use good manners.

  11. MK

    NSR: Trouble is, I’m wrong just often enough to keep me from trusting my gut when I should.

    Allowing yourself to fail occasionally is a very good thing. I force myself to repeat “I cannot fail, only get more results” still only rarely have the balls to take the plunge. It truly sucks being doubting Thomas.

  12. YES. In general you cannot transition from one stage of competence to the next without sometimes experiencing failure.

  13. MK

    Gun, we have to balance hardwired instincts, acquired habits and rational knowledge, all of which are tied into who were are more deeply than using a soldering iron or playing the piano.

    All true. This is a really good comment. Got me thinking.

    That’s a major reason I stay engaged in the Manosphere despite going MGTOW Monk, because human sexuality equates human personality.

    As long as men focus on self-improvement and personal achievement, MGTOW Monk makes a lot of sense to me these days.

  14. Pingback: This Week In Reaction (2017/05/14) - Social Matter

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