Called Out

I have been following the discussion in Deepstrength’s latest post, Women teaching women in Church. A longer post is in the works for Thursday which is aimed at the central point of DS’s post, the teaching role of Women. However, the discussion got me thinking about another subject, namely, how in Protestant circles it seems to be a frequent occurrence for Pastors/Ministers to “call out” the men in the congregation (I suppose this can also be happening in Catholic parishes, but I’ve never seen it).

I got to thinking about this whole “calling out” process and its roots. Jesus calls out several specific groups in the Gospels. Among them are the Scribes, Pharisees and Sadducees. However, He keeps this either very specific (individuals, or members of groups like the aforementioned) or very general (everyone). I cannot recall a single instance where Jesus called out men, as a group, or women, as a group. Admittedly, my knowledge of Scripture still needs improvement. So I am asking my readers if they know of any examples that I might have overlooked.

It seems to me that Jesus never did any such thing, in part because it would be destructive, not constructive. This is because it would set men and women against each other. The Devil was/is the one who set women against men, and men against women. God wouldn’t do such  a thing. At least, that is how I read it. I am curious to hear what others think.

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6 Comments

Filed under Christianity, Churchianity, God, Men, The Church, Women

6 responses to “Called Out

  1. Yep.

    In general, correction or rebuke needs to be specific. And it’s unlikely that “all” of a particularly large group — say husbands — are all doing the same thing that they would need correction. Generally speaking, even if they did it would best happen privately in say a men’s group.

    In the general congregation it often creates a problem that may not really exist in the first place or is only isolated to a few specific individuals.

  2. Michael Kozaki

    a frequent occurrence for to “call out” the men in the congregation

    I’m dying to hear this. Jealous! First, so I can LOL rudely during a sermon (on my bucket list). Second, so I can walk out front-and-center like I saw two people do once during a birth control sermon (I’ve only got to walk out once, but at the beginning when a woman parish administrator led a communion service…me and all the wife/kids rudely walked…it was beautiful and I wanna to do it again). Third, i want meet the pastor with the balls so I can engage him in some “discussion” afterwards…my idea of real fun.

    in part because it would be destructive, not constructive.

    I don’t have a problem with calling out one sex or the other if needed, when the main culture is out-of-wack on some gender issue. Say a Muslim culture regarding men abusing women, or a modern culture regarding women acting like men. Everyone needs to hear it publicly, so the public disorder can be rejected by the community together.

  3. I don’t have a problem with calling out one sex or the other if needed, when the main culture is out-of-wack on some gender issue. Say a Muslim culture regarding men abusing women, or a modern culture regarding women acting like men. Everyone needs to hear it publicly, so the public disorder can be rejected by the community together.

    Yeah, I got to thinking about this after posting. I don’t think that addressing a matter that applies general to one sex is an issue. Or husbands or wives for a slightly more specific subset. Rather, I think it is the manner it is done. The kind of “how dare you/shame on you” stuff that folks like Driscoll do is destructive. But general admonishments and not ones that specifically target, say, all the men in the building, would be different.

  4. But general admonishments and not ones that specifically target, say, all the men in the building, would be different.

    Yeah, I think this mainly applies if Christians are say caving to different cultural things like feminism. It would be a good thing to denounce “cultural revelations” that can easily deceive Christians such as feminism within the Church

  5. Admonishing his flock is necessary – but it must be to the purpose of gathering them in.

    Weak men like Driscoll merely want to appear like they gather. What they really do is sow weeds among good plants. Then they can stand on the good fruits, let the weeds grow around them, and claim they’re superior to the weeds.

    Choke out life, and don’t be surprised when you have made a bed of death to lie in.

  6. Choke out life, and don’t be surprised when you have made a bed of death to lie in.

    This is rather profound, taking it a bit out of Donal’s post. How do men best create life? This is an off the cuff thought and not deeply thought about at all, but I think by taming the land. How does a woman create life? By nurturing it.

    One is hard and one is soft and yet both have the same end. When these become mixed up, weeds grow.

    Anyway, that one sentence struck me . . . .

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