A Second Opinion

There is an interesting feeling when you get confirmation of various matters discussed in the ‘sphere. On the one hand there is a sense of comfort in knowing you aren’t crazy, or that other people aren’t fooling you. On the other hand there is the attendant discomfort and distress at realizing things really are that bad.

I experienced that odd feeling lately during a conversation at my church following the liturgy. I talked with a guy I had seen before but hadn’t had a chance to chat with. He turned out to be a convert from a Protestant background. During our conversation, which involved several other parties at points, the subject of marriage came up. It was fascinating to hear him confirm many of the various concepts and experiences which have been voiced around these parts. A few examples:

  • Daughter of the King Syndrome
  • How many churches discourage young marriage, and are therefore afflicted with the instance of few marriages
  • The opposite, and rarer instance, where Protestant churches would vocally encourage young marriage… and do nothing to support it.
  • Christian women on the whole delaying marriage as long as they can to prioritize other things first.
  • Christian men being told they had to have everything in their life lined up perfectly in order to marry.

Anticipating a question from the comments, no, as far as I knew this man (who was a bit older than I, and also single) knew nothing of the ‘sphere. But he had experienced Evangelical Christianity, which made him familiar with all of that. All in all, it was a fascinating and enlightening experience. My goal now is to seek out some other Catholic men who weren’t converts and get their stories. I’m curious as to the differences in experiences. I’ve covered my own here, but as the post title indicates, it’s always good to get a second opinion.

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14 Comments

Filed under Marriage, Red Pill, The Church

14 responses to “A Second Opinion

  1. fuzziewuzziebear

    I have to admit that a lot of what I have in this little corner of the internet confirmed that which I have observed. Most of what I didn’t were underlying causes.
    I have to wonder how many men of like mind are out there who have no idea of the manosphere’s existance but have deduced a lot of it on their own.

  2. Feminine But Not Feminist

    @ Fuzzie

    I have to wonder how many men of like mind are out there who have no idea of the manosphere’s existance but have deduced a lot of it on their own.

    How many licks does it take to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop?…. 😉

    [DG: Heh. An off the wall yet apt answer.]

  3. The reason why people stick around with something is because it resonates with them on some level. Whether it’s sports, whether it’s intellectual pursuits, whether it’s an interesting career or hobby, whether it’s the manosphere.

    People stick around when they find the manosphere because it resonates with them. Things make sense after that.

    I’m also curious on Fuzzie’s assertion that men have figured much of it out but don’t know of places like the manosphere to discuss it.

  4. mdavid

    fuz…men who don’t know the manosphere but have deduced a lot

    Age is key. Born before 1970? Hopeless. After 1990 usually get it. Unmarried is usually better than married guys as well.

    I’ve been both pleasantly surprised (eating dinner with a church guy who had even read Roissy…it was funny watching us talk around that) yet very disappointing how strong the WK is in most men. Same for clergy; they won’t wake up until most families are toast & the collection plate dries up.

  5. @ Deep Strength

    I’m also curious on Fuzzie’s assertion that men have figured much of it out but don’t know of places like the manosphere to discuss it.

    I think many “Blue Pill” men know bits and pieces, and a few know large parts of it all. The problem is that they haven’t put it together- something which is hard to do on your own these days, for a myriad of reasons.

  6. @ mdavid

    Age is key. Born before 1970? Hopeless. After 1990 usually get it. Unmarried is usually better than married guys as well.

    Agreed. I think younger men better realize that the Rules Have Changed (to borrow a line from Rollo).

  7. Maea

    Not trying to speak for him, but my husband is married and has deduced about the current state of the MMP. He’s Gen X.

  8. Maea

    Pardon my ignorance but what is “Daughter Of the King” syndrome?

  9. @ Maea

    Pardon my ignorance but what is “Daughter Of the King” syndrome

    It refers to how many Christian daughters are raised to think of themselves as “daughters of the king” (Jesus), and to act accordingly. If this was actually done right, it would mean that they act dignified and responsibly. Instead they are raised to be entitled princesses who behave as anything other than daughters of the Lord.

  10. mdavid

    Maea, He’s Gen X.

    Me too. Note 70-90 is a sliding scale; awareness starts earlier each decade. I’ve even seen some boomer men finally “get it” (the ones who got screwed). Like most social changes, the 51/49 shift will be sudden and the wheels will just fall off overnight, like the ’60s. Immigration and broken families don’t favor SWPL liberalism (like feminism). Team Woman won’t have many friends in a decade or two, methinks.

  11. Maea

    Ah, it’s entitled princesses. Terminology varies so much at times. From what I’ve observed on and off the ‘net, there’s a lot of idolatry.

  12. Daughter of the King syndrome is also known as EAP — Evangelical American Princess or Entitled American Princess.

    As Donal said… essentially, it’s Disney princess syndrome tied up with Christianity. Women feel entitled to a Christian husband swooping in out of the blue romantically, and if they don’t get what they deserve they are nasty to you or hold you in contempt.

  13. One of the other guys who works with me in youth ministry once asked me, “Hey Beefy, a lot of what you say reminds me of stuff I’ve read in the manosphere. Have you heard of it?”

    I smirked and said, “Yes. Yes I am.”

  14. Pingback: This Week in Reaction (2015/09/06) | The Reactivity Place

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