Saturday Saints- #29

We move to the letter B, and today’s saint- the Venerable Bede:

Bede (/ˈbd/ BEED; Old English: Bǣda or Bēda; 672/673 – 26 May 735), also referred to as Saint Bede or the Venerable Bede (Latin: Bēda Venerābilis), was an English monk at the monastery of Saint Peter at Monkwearmouth and its companion monastery, Saint Paul’s, in modern Jarrow (see Monkwearmouth-Jarrow), Northeast England, both of which were located in the Kingdom of Northumbria. He is well known as an author and scholar, and his most famous work, Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History of the English People) gained him the title “The Father of English History”.

In 1899, Bede was made a Doctor of the Church by Leo XIII, a position of theological significance; he is the only native of Great Britain to achieve this designation (Anselm of Canterbury, also a Doctor of the Church, was originally from Italy). Bede was moreover a skilled linguist and translator, and his work made the Latin and Greek writings of the early Church Fathers much more accessible to his fellow Anglo-Saxons, contributing significantly to English Christianity. Bede’s monastery had access to a superb library which included works by Eusebius and Orosius, among many others.

There is a very, very long wiki article on Saint Bede, which I won’t try and summarize even further. Instead, I will leave the link to the wiki here. Those who are interested in the history of England, and especially the history of Christianity in England, will likely enjoy reading it.

The Venerable Bede

Update: Since I am on the subject of Saints, I found this article fascinating. It covers Pope Francis’ recent beatification of South Korean martyrs who refused to give up their faith. I had never realized that the Church in South Korea was founded by members of the nobility who learned of by reading books about it.

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One response to “Saturday Saints- #29

  1. Pingback: Saturday Saints- Registry | Donal Graeme

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